BDSM: Curse or blessing?

According to insiders, between 500,000 and eight million people in Germany are interested in BDSM practices. The abbreviation stands for “Bondage & Dis”: Bondage & Discipline, Dominance & Submission and Sadism & Masochism and thus extends the previous general term SM for sadomasochism. The widespread reading of books such as “Shades of Grey” is likely to have contributed a great deal to the great popularity.

The “real” BDSMers smile at what well-behaved couples have done to each other since then with the help of blindfolds and scarves during love play. Because the practices of the BDSM range from this playful bondage, biting, spanking ass and eyes connect far up to painful punishments, the total restrictions of mobility and psychological humiliation – more here and in the ORION fetish blog.

  1. In the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) this preference still falls under the heading of sexual preference disorders. But is it still possible to speak of a disorder at all with such a prevalence?
  2. On the contrary, according to a study by Nyenrode University, people with this preference appear to be mentally healthier than others. More about this below.

The disease “sadomasochism

First of all, the question of what exactly a disturbance of sexual preference means: This is understood as the sexual urge for an unusual sexual object or an unusual sexual stimulation, such as fetishism, transvestism, voyeurism, but also pedophilia.

And sexual sadomasochism. In the ICD-10, under F65.5, the following explanation can be found: “Sexual activities with pain, humiliation or bondage are preferred. If the affected person suffers this type of stimulation, it is masochism; if it is inflicted on someone else, it is sadism. Often the person concerned experiences sexual arousal during both masochistic and sadistic activities. “* Hm, eight million people with a preference disorder? Or eight million people who are quite normal if we just change the definition?

Sadomasochism is not an invention of our time either. We only have to look at the cruelties in the old paintings and illustrations of the late Middle Ages. Nobody can tell me that the viewer wasn’t interested in the pleasure of pain even then. By the way, these pictures can still be found in the literature of the BDSM today.

An early cataloguing that is still in people’s minds today

What is “unusual sexual stimulation” today? In the early days of sexual science at the end of the 19th century, the German psychiatrist von Krafft-Ebing catalogued all sexual practices that were considered deviant and perverse in his day. And in the prudish days of the bourgeoisie, just about everything fell into this category, apart from the marital missionary position. Some of the practices today have been rehabilitated – such as masturbation and homosexuality – while others are far from rehabilitated – such as sadomasochism.

For some time now, there have been calls to remove the symptoms sadism and masochism from the ICD-10. Today it is generally assumed that a disorder is only a disorder if the person affected has a problem with it or injures others with his or her actions. But the stigma of classification remains and often leads to a problem itself. “It is written there that my actions are ill. Then I am probably that too” is one of those beliefs. BDSM, Sadism and Masochism are also very popular topics in virtual reality sex movies and normal porn.

Everything quite normal? Everything quite normal!

In 2013, a study by Nyenrode University in the Netherlands was published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. 1336 people with and without a tendency towards BDSM were asked about their character traits, their general well-being, how they deal with rejection and their relationship behaviour.

Conclusion

Contrary to previous opinion, BDSM supporters are psychologically healthier than flower sex supporters. They are “less neurotic, more open, more sensitive to rejection and have more stable relationships “*. Yoo-hoo, finally land in sight? The desire for power and submission is often associated with traumatic experiences. This may well be a trigger, but it also applies to many other people.

One explanation for this unexpected result could actually be that BDSMers are more open abo

ut their sexual desires. They communicate about it and live it out in one way or another. This is more than some others or others can say about themselves. The eternal non-disclosure of what one wants leads in the long run to sexual frustration and inner bending. And sometimes also violent discharges.